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Father’s of ADHD Children

child-psychologist

A father’s involvement in a child’s academic life can be very beneficial to a child with ADHD. Traditionally mothers have taken the responsibility of attending school events and joining the PTA, but a father’s role in the schooling of his child is important to a child’s healthy development.

How can a father help?

Here are steps that fathers can take at home and at school that make a positive difference for their children’s education.

At home, fathers can:

  • Read with their children. Children with ADHD struggle to read and many never develop the joy of reading.  By setting time before bedtime to read with your son or daughter, a father shows the value of reading and that he himself enjoys books. This will model to a child that reading is an important part of one’s life and can actually be fun. This also cements the association of reading with pleasant feelings of connection and bonding.
  • Establish a daily routine. It’s important for fathers, in coordination with mothers, to set a time for homework, chores and other activities. Find out what assignments are coming up and see if the child would like help. By offering assistance on homework or projects, a father sends the important message that he is available and interested in a child’s life.

At school, fathers can:

  • Attend parent-teacher conferences and school or class events. Just knowing his or her father went to the school sends a strong message that school is important.
  • Volunteer at school. Fathers can offer to lead a field trip or organize a bake sale.
  • Visit their child’s school. 
  • Meet their child’s teachers and learn about school curriculum, and how to become involved in activities.
  • Help meet school and program needs, such as installing new playground equipment, cooking at a school picnic or painting and repairing school property.
  • Join the Parent Teacher Association or other parent groups.

If you are a father of an ADHD child, your participation in his or her academic life is important. By reading with your child, offering to help with school projects and attending school events, you’re sending a strong message that school is place to have fun and learn.

For more information or guidance on parenting a child with ADHD, call us at 646-807-8900.

Sachs Center

235 West 76th Street
1B,
New York, NY 10023
United States (US)
Phone: 646-847-9722
Email: george.sachs@sachscenter.com
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